The Pros & Cons Of Waving A Residential Home Inspection

The real estate market is on fire right now! If you’re a seller, the good news is houses are coming on the market and receiving multiple cash offers within days of listing. If you’re a buyer, chances are you’re going to be vying with several other buyers for any home you are interested in.

After months of house hunting, you might not want to let this one getaway. You need an edge. One way to sweeten your offer is to waive the home inspection to expedite the buying process and stand out from the competition. While this tactic could end up with you winning the home, it could also end up costing you big time down the road!

A home is probably the biggest and most important investment you’ll make in your lifetime. So it’s absolutely crucial to your sanity and your bank account that you do your due diligence and have all of the facts and figures in place before you commit and sign a purchase agreement. Otherwise, instead of your dream home, you could be investing in a money pit!

Of course, some homeowners are ok with taking the risk to get the house they want. In this post, we will take a closer look at what a home inspection is and offer the pros and cons of waiving a home inspection.

What is a Home Inspection?

If you’ve ever gone through the home buying process, you’re probably familiar with a home inspection. Typically, once you’ve signed a purchase agreement and the home is under contract, you bring in professional, certified home inspectors to perform a visual, in-person inspection.

This process is done to protect the buyer from any hidden problems. The inspector will walk through the home, inside and outside, and check its condition, the issue a report outlining what they have found. Inspection reports typically include any roof and termite damage, as well as structural issues and systems checks, including electrical, plumbing, and HVAC. In addition, the inspector will also document the home’s general interior and exterior features and condition, appliances, sprinkler system, pool, windows, doors, etc.

When the inspection is complete, the inspector sends his findings to the buyer. The buyer uses this information to first decide how to proceed. Depending on the information in the report, the buyer may use it as a negotiating tool to request that the seller pays for certain repairs before closing or reduce the sale price. If the damage is extensive, it provides a legal way to back out of the deal.

For this reason, sellers want the inspection to go as smoothly as possible. If they want to sell quickly, they are often willing to negotiate to make it happen.

Why Buyers Are Willing to Waive the Home Inspection

Right now in New England, we’re in the hottest real estate market in DECADES! According to NerdWallet’s 2021 Home Buyer Report, nationally, an estimated 28 million Americans are planning on buying a home in the coming year. At the end of 2020, the supply of homes available in the US was just 1.04 million units. According to the National Association of Realtors, this is the lowest number of available units since data collection began in 1982!

With multiple buyers vying for properties and bidding wars becoming the norm, waiving the home inspection can become a compelling offer for a seller. The National Association of Home Builders Housing Trend Report found that being outbid was the most common reason buyers cited for not yet purchasing a home. So it makes sense that an eager buyer would be willing to waive the home inspection contingency.

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The Risks of Waiving a Home Inspection

A home inspection is an important element of the home buying process for protecting a buyer’s financial interests. For example, learning that a home you’re interested in may need a new septic system costing $10,000 can change your mind about buying it or the amount you’re willing to spend. Without a home inspection, you might not find out about the problem until after you take possession, and you will lose any negotiating leverage you might have.

Another consideration is the health and safety of your family. Home inspections can uncover potential hazards in a home, like bad wiring, unsafe heating, or asbestos that the average person would not find during a pre-closing walkthrough.

So Should You Waive The Inspection?

As a general rule, the answer is no unless you’re willing and financially able to assume all potential risks. Waiving the inspection is especially problematic in an older house. That being said, there are a couple of instances when waiving the inspection is more of a calculated risk.

If, for instance, you are buying new construction and the home is under the builder warranty, or if the seller of a home or condo has had existing conditional reports compiled within the past year, it is “potentially” ok to waive the right to an inspection, IF it’s the only way to ensure your offer is accepted.

Again, it all comes down to the amount of risk you’re willing to take. Remember, even new construction can have problems that an inspection could uncover. The bottom line, spending a few hundred dollars on an inspection is almost always a good investment. However, in a market that is hot, taking a calculated risk may be necessary to ensure your bid is accepted.

Making A Strong Offer Without Waiving the Inspection

While any seller will prefer receiving an offer that waives the home inspection, there are ways and tactics allowing you to present a strong offer that will appeal to a seller and keep the inspection on the table.

  • Be fully preapproved!

Having a preapproval letter from a lender in hand when presenting your offer carries weight. It not only shows the seller you’re serious but that you have financing available to close the deal.

  • Ask for an “informational inspection” contingency.

This language tells the seller that you will be getting a full, professional inspection but only for informational purposes. Any information it uncovers will be for you. You won’t be asking them to pay for any issues it uncovers.

  • Make a larger downpayment.

It might mean saving for a little longer, but seeing more upfront cash might tempt a seller. It feels like more money in their pockets right away. This can signal that your financing is solid and the deal will close.

  • Add an Escalation Clause.

This is another tactic that is attractive to sellers. An escalation clause eliminates the need for a back-and-forth negotiation between two buyers. For example, say you’re interested in a home that is listed for $175,000. You can offer to automatically bid $1000 over any other offer with a cap of $200,000.

While these tactics can help you look more attractive to a seller and leave the home inspection clause intact, you might still lose out to a buyer willing to take the risk and waive the inspection, especially in a tough market like today. Regardless, if you lose out, brush yourself off, and keep looking! Eventually, you’ll find your home and do it in a way that is comfortable for you!

Can a Home Warranty Help?

Ultimately, if you opt to waive the home inspection, consider purchasing a home warranty. Whichever path you choose, a home warranty provides you with a safety net should unexpected expenses present themselves. Click here to learn more about Home Warranty programs, benefits, and pricing.